Tag Archives: LGBT

Celebration IS the way through.

Celebration Quotes & Questions

Quotes and Questions_MIN_Censored2CelebratedI’ve been collecting quotes and questions on Pinterest,
and also wanted to post some of my
absolute favorites on the website.
Enjoy!  
~Melita

Quotes & Questions for You…

Quote_Celebration IS the way through_MelitaInaraNoël_Censored2Celebrated

Celegration IS the way through

Why isn't this a gender nonspecific restroom sign?

Why isn’t this a gender nonspecific restroom sign?

AudreLordequote_Made verbal and shared_PeeInPeace_Censored2Celebrated

Audre Lorde on speaking one’s truth

bell hooks on power

bell hooks on power

"What one reads becomes a part of what one sees and feels." Ralph Ellison #CelebrationTour

“What one reads becomes a part of what one sees and feels.” Ralph Ellison

Q for Librarians: What's your favorite book celebration DSG?

What’s your favorite children’s or young adult book celebrating Diverse Sexuality and Gender (DSG)?


 

Parenting Tips from Remi Newman

Remi's Parenting Tips

Remi’s Parenting Tips

Remi Newman Parenting Tip 1- Impart Your Values_Censored2CelebratedRemi's Parenting Tip #2 - Start EarlyRemi Newman Parenting Tip 3 - It's Never Too Late
Remi Newman Parenting Tip 4 - Be honest
Remi Newman Parenting Tip 5 - Make a Plan


More Favorites…

Quote that Inspires Amy : "The best is yet to come." - William Shakespeare

Quote that Inspires Author Amy G. Dalia

Celebrate DSG

Celebrating Diverse Sexuality and Gender

This work is truly world wide_Joel Baum and Mexico City_Gender Spectrum_Censored2Celebrated_July2014

Joel Baum on connecting with 140 people in Mexico City via the Censored2Celebrated-facilitated webcast during the Gender Spectrum conference: “This work is truly world wide.”

Censored2Celebrated_AhaMoment_MNCantu

What’s an aha moment you’ve had recently about Diverse Sexuality and Gender?

In response to this meme: "Normal is a setting on a clothes dryer." - Dr. Sally Ember

In response to this meme: “Normal is a setting on a clothes dryer!” – Dr. Sally Ember

Censored2Celebrated_98vs2_MNCantu

Do you agree? 98% commonality vs. 2% difference?

Celebrate all the people in your life.

How Melita wraps-up every webcast: “Celebrate ALL the people in your life.”

#ItGetsAwesome #CelebrationStories #DSG

“It doesn’t get better. It gets awesome.” – Mimi Lemay

Celebrate Inspiration to Live Life Fully

Celebrate Inspiration to Live Life Fully

What does DSG mean to you?

What does Diverse Sexuality and Gender (DSG) mean to you? Share your thoughts – and favorite quotes too! – with us in the comments here.

Author who celebrates diverse sexuality & gender

Amy G. Dalia, featured guest on Censored2Celebrated for Chat #2 (Season 2)

Season 2, Chat 2 features author Amy G. Dalia.
Amy helped shape our book selections
for the Celebration Tour!

AmyGDalia_RainbowHeader_101515_Censored2CelebratedRSVP to tune in for the Blab with Amy and Melita on Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 1 pm CST here.


Why Join Us for the Live Blab?
Our webcasted conversation is an opportunity for allies and advocates of the LGBTQ community to gather. Together, we will explore how to connect with youth in order to support – and celebrate – them around diverse gender and sexuality.

We will also be speaking to writers and readers of LGBTQ stories.

Check out Amy’s extensive lists focusing on books for youth celebrating diverse sexuality and gender:

 

Amy G. Dalia: author who celebrates LGBT themes

Amy G. Dalia: Celebrating LGBT themes

About Author Amy G. Dalia
Season 2 continues with special guest Amy G. Dalia, inspiration for many of the books that were gifted to the Celebration Tour.

Amy is an author who makes a difference for LGBTQ youth, families, and anyone who’s ever felt they’re somehow “less” or “other” in the world. She is currently writing a contemporary Young Adult (YA) novel with LGBTQ themes. She also has a YA fantasy trilogy stewing on the back burner.

You can check out her blog here. And here’s a FREE sample of her book – just in time for celebrating Halloween!

Amy is passionate about LGBTQ equality, travel, and anything related to Greece. She is the proud mama of three children.

Quote that Inspires Amy : "The best is yet to come." - William Shakespeare

Quote that Inspires Amy

Check out Amy’s writing portfolio here. Connect with Amy here.


 

More on What We’ll Be Talking About in Season 2
Each month in Season 2, we’ll be diving deeper into our discoveries from the Celebration Tour 2015. In September, for Chat 1, we talked with author and educator Sally Ember, Ed.D. Watch the video clip with Sally here.

To launch our new season we wanted to explore some of the most common questions we covered last year in Season 1, give you insight into the many reasons we align ourselves with the rainbow, and lay the groundwork for our next-level conversations focusing on the Celebration Tour.

Click here for a Rainbow Video Clip Q&A with Melita about DSG

Click here for the Rainbow Video Clip Q&A series with Melita about Celebrating Diverse Sexuality & Gender

Get all the Censored2Celebrated news delivered to your in-box:
Sign up for emails here.

Day9_CallMeTree_Censored2Celebrated_June15

Day 9: Call Me Tree – Llámame arbol

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DAY 9
Call Me Tree – Llámame arbol
by Maya Christina Gonzalez


With gratitude to Susie Hayes for gifting this colorful – and bilingual – book that ends with this quote:
Call me tree  /  Llámame árbol
Because  /  Porque
I am tall  /  Soy alto
I am strong  / Soy fuerte
And like a tree  /  Y como un árbol
I am free  / Soy libre


 Day9_CallMeTree_Censored2Celebrated_June15_YouTube


Call Me Tree
You may have noticed some transgender people have been a bit busy breaking cultural taboos recently. There are a few hashtags running around which might be recognizable.

Depending on your relationship with the transgender community, you may know one or all three of these hashtags: 

It has been a week where Caitlyn Jenner’s image on the cover of Vanity Fair was tweeted the world over. It has also included notable responses from the transgender community such as Jenn Dolari and Crystal Frasier’s powerful call for trans people to create their own Vanity Fair cover celebrating the beauty and strength in the transgender community. (They also wanted to make the point that not every trans person can – or wants to – subscribe to “white, cisnormative beauty standards.”)

Celebrating in Philly
This flurry of conversation about transgender matters has merged with my own experience as I witness friends and colleagues enjoying their time at the Philly Trans Health Conference. In the ever-expanding trans conference circuit – 20+ conferences planned as of January 2015! –  the 14th annual #PTHC2015 conference was attended by over 3,000 people from around the globe.

It was celebrated with the Transgender flag flying proudly at City Hall, and just wrapped up on June 6th. As quoted in The AdvocateNellie Fitzpatrick, Philadelphia’s director of LGBT affairs says:

“Far too often the ‘T’ is left behind or out of sight when we talk about LGBT issues, and it’s important to visibly make a commitment to work that we know needs to be done. I can’t think of anything more visible than putting the trans flag right next to the American flag at City Hall,” she told Philadelphia Gay News.

“We have far too many times where the trans community is mourning, from Trans Day of Remembrance to every time we lose somebody. But instead we should take a moment and revel in the empowerment of where the community is going because that’s incredibly important to celebrate.”

Enough about Hashtags & Trans Flags…What About Books?!
Yesterday, on June 6th – are you seeing a pattern yet?! – the New York Times noted something I’ve been witnessing as I prepare for the Celebration Tour. There seems to be a celebratory explosion of wonderful books being written by and for transgender kids and young adults.

Author Sam Martin, who is now 43 and transitioned after reading a photo journalist book featuring transgender people, says, “When I was growing up, I never saw people like me in movies or books.” He continues:

“My goal was to write stories that would have helped me feel less alone at that age,” said Mr. Martin, who works as a Starbucks barista in Washington and writes at night.

A few years ago, gender fluidity was rarely addressed in children’s and young adult fiction. It remained one of the last taboos in a publishing category that had already taken on difficult issues like suicide, drug abuse, rape and sex trafficking. But children’s literature is catching up to the broader culture, as stereotypes of transgender characters have given way to nuanced and sympathetic portrayals on TV shows like “Orange Is the New Black” and “Transparent.”

Transgender actress-activist, Laverne Cox, echoes this sentiment when she reviewed the book I Am Jazz, co-authored by Jessica Herthel and Jazz Jennings.

Laverne Cox on "I Am Jazz"

Arin Andrews, 19 year old author of Some Assembly Required, makes a similar point in The New York Times article:

Mr. Andrews, 19, said that books for young adults on the subject were scarce when he began transitioning to male from female in 2011.

“When I first started transitioning, I mostly had YouTube as a source,” he said. “I wanted to write a book to help others because there were not a lot of sources out there, and I thought that one book could save a person’s life.”

Mr. Andrews says he receives 15 to 20 Facebook messages a day from readers about his memoir, “Some Assembly Required,” including notes from children as young as 8 and readers in their 60s and 70s who say the book helps them navigate questions about their gender identity.

Books are a path to self-understanding, and these books are clearly making a difference for many people – of all ages. I cannot wait to see what books will make a difference for the people I will be meeting on the Celebration Tour!

Call Me Tree / Llámame árbol
While there are a number of books which focus on what it feels like to move from one gender box to another, there are fewer that focus on the non-binary experience. These are the kids and adults who identify as gender creative, gender expansive, gender fluid, and/or gender non-conforming. Recently, my webcast guest, Krysti Ryan, noted how she has seen an increase – just in the past year – around the next generation pushing the gender binary norms.

Call Me Tree fits that need in that it provides a “gender free” multicultural reading experience where all children can see themselves. 

The author, Maya Christina Gonzalez, writes:

You may or may not notice something different about my new book, Call Me Tree. Nowhere in the story are boy/girl pronouns used. No ‘he’ or ‘she’ anywhere! I found it easy to write this way because that’s how I think of kids, as kids, not boy kids or girl kids.

I even requested that no ‘he’ or ‘she’ be used anywhere else in the book, like on the end pages or the back cover when talking about the story. I also asked the publisher to only refer to the main character as a child or kid when they talked about my book out in the world. Because I wanted Call Me Tree to be gender free!

(Read the note to the reader from the author about creating a “gender free multicultural book” here.)

Gender Free
While I knew this book was “gender free” before I read it, and liked that it was about growth (a big theme for me), and celebration, I was curious if reviewers would recognize or highlight the gender free message. None of the reviews I found seemed to even notice this message, and always referred to the child (“Tree”) in the book using the “he” pronoun.

Given that the author was very intentionally creating this book to be gender free, I was happy to see this review where Crystalee of The Best Books Ever, writes:

I rushed out and picked up a copy from the library. It’s a beautiful picture book with bright illustrations and sparse language in both English and Spanish. However, if I had never read the article, I probably wouldn’t have realized the gender-neutral tones. This isn’t a book that hits you over the head with an agenda, but it DOES do a great job of conveying the message that everyone is unique and everyone should go after their dreams.

Like me, this reviewer knew about the intentionality around gender. On one hand, given the more subtle undertones about gender, this book may appeal to a broader audience, and it may not be as likely to get challenged or banned. On the other hand, it could mean that some youth who would enjoy – and see themselves reflected in it – may not know how to access it easily.

Alphabet Soup Paradox
This seems the paradox around how and why we choose to categorize any literature – or identities, for that matter. Witness the many discussions around language and the LGBTQ+ alphabet soup that we discuss on my monthly webcast. Regardless, I will be interested to see which library chooses this book to add to their collection, and why!

Our Favorite Quote
My daughter, Tulip Lavender (her chosen pen name), loves that this book is bilingual. She particularly enjoyed sharing it with her bilingual Spanish/English 1st grade class earlier this year.

Some trees reach
Some trees teach
Some trees stand so still

Algunos árboles se extienden
Algunos árboles se enseñan
Algunos árboles se quedan tan quietos


How Do You Celebrate Diversity?

Share in the comments how this, or another book, has changed – or even saved – a life. I will be highlighting your celebratory quotes about books I feature in my #aBookaDay blog.

Click to find out how you can support the Celebration Tour.

Thank you for your generosity!

In celebration~
Melita

PS: Click here to gift this book, or another book, to a library along the Celebration Tour!

 

Tulip Lavender on Libraries

Support Libraries & Librarians by Supporting our Celebration Tour!

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Day 6_Roland Humphrey_C2C_May15 (2)

Day 6: Roland Humphrey is Wearing a WHAT?

DAY 6
Roland Humphrey is Wearing a WHAT?
by Eileen Kiernan-Johnson
Illustrated by Katrina Revenaugh


With gratitude to Sue for gifting this colorful, life-changing book
to the Celebration Tour.

Sue says:
“I read this to my daughter (mtf) when she was 5, and when we got to the end she exclaimed, “Roland is just like me!” It was the first time we read a book she really related to….very powerful.”


Day6_Roland Humphrey_Censored2Celebrated_May15_YouTube


From: Picture Books Review
Roland Humphrey is Wearing a WHAT?

Not surprisingly, the book was written about the author’s own son. Looking her up, I found her blog which I felt was pretty interesting, and goes into more detail and emotional honesty than the upbeat ending of the book delivers: “We like you for you, whatever you wear.”

After her son had decided that he wanted to start wearing boy clothes because of the comments of some of his classmates, Kiernan-Johnson writes: “I suppose it was inevitable that the weight of peer pressure would reach him at some point. I just imagined that it would be further down the road, that we’d have more time to inhabit our happy little bubble of authenticity, that he could obliviously be who he is without the burden of arbitrary societal dictates intruding on that.  It isn’t that I want my son to waltz through life in a ballgown; it is that I don’t want the world to crush his spirit and stamp out his unique way of being. I don’t want it to burst his bubble.”

I don’t think she has to worry about the world crushing his spirits just yet (that doesn’t happen until you start working), but it did make going back reading the joyful exuberance of “Roland Humphrey” a bit bittersweet, and for me, more meaningful.

From an interview with the author, Eileen Kiernan-Johnson, about her experience reading this book to children:

Usually there are a few shy comments about how “my brother likes pink,” or “my brother likes to wear girls’ swimsuits,” etc.( and it has been kind of amazing to hear about how many of these little “pink boys” are out there) but usually it segues into a very broad conversation about the small and large unkindnesses children endure no matter what they wear and how they present themselves.

Kids pick up on the universality of the acceptance themes and seem to be really hungry to talk about the slings and arrows that have bruised their small hearts. It has been a tremendous honor to be trusted with some of those stories. I was expecting more narrow questions about why Roland liked girls’ clothes etc., but these kids have been so savvy and have just honed in on the heart of the story and message and have been really honest in sharing how their own experiences have resembled the character’s. It has been an unexpected privilege to hold those stories with the kids.


My Favorite Quote
I’m so much more than what colors or clothes I choose. And if you judge me on just that, I’ve got some sad news: You’re the one who misses out. It’s what inside that really counts.


How Do You Celebrate Diversity?

Share in the comments how this, or another book, has changed – or even saved – a life. I will be highlighting your celebratory quotes about books I feature in my #aBookaDay blog.

Click to find out how you can support the Celebration Tour.

Thank you for your generosity!

In celebration~
Melita

PS: Click here to gift this book, or another book, to a library along the Celebration Tour!

Tulip Lavender on Libraries

Support Libraries & Librarians by Supporting our Celebration Tour!

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Day 5_The Book of Lost Things_Caleb_C2C_May15 (1)

Day 5: The Book of Lost Things

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DAY 5: May 19th
The Book of Lost Things
by John Connolly


With gratitude to Caleb Matthews for donating this book. We are looking forward to listening to this as an audio book on the Celebration Tour!

Caleb says:
“I read this book when I was 12 or 13. It is the first book that
I had ever read where a character
was gay and a moral beacon for the main character.”


Day5_The Book of Lost Things_Censored2Celebrated_May15_YouTube

Book Review: The Independent
The Book of Lost Things

As suggested by the title, The Book of Lost Things is a novel that contains itself.

The Hitchcock-style plot “MacGuffin” is the search for a scrapbook called “The Book of Lost Things” owned by the king of a magical land. But late in the day we are told that the book we are holding is also part of the plot, purportedly authored not by thriller writer John Connolly but by the grown-up version of David, the 12-year-old who seems to be the hero of the third-person narrative. It’s a tricksy approach, but then again this is a book with a trickster for a villain: the Crooked Man, who is also Rumplestiltskin of the fairy tale. The novel plays any number of games with stories famous and forgotten.

Caleb Matthews gifted this YA book. Here he talks about how it connects with Diverse Sexuality & Gender:


Caleb’s Favorite Quote
For in every adult there dwells the child that was, and in every child there lies the adult that will be.


How Do You Celebrate Diversity?

  • Do you have a favorite book that celebrates the Diversity of Sexuality & Gender?
  • Have you read the The Book of Lost Things?

Share in the comments how this, or another book, has changed – or even saved – a life. I will be highlighting your celebratory quotes about books I feature in my #aBookaDay blog.

Click to find out how you can support the Celebration Tour.

Thank you for your generosity!

In celebration~
Melita

PS: Click here to gift this book, or another book, to a library along the Celebration Tour!

Tulip Lavender on Libraries

Support Libraries & Librarians by Supporting our Celebration Tour!

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Day 3_And Tango Makes Three_C2C_May15

Day 3: And Tango Makes Three

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DAY 3: May 17th
And Tango Makes Three
by Justin Richardson, Peter Parnell & Henry Cole


With gratitude to Amy Pittel for donating this book that has allowed  so many individuals, libraries, and communities to move From Censored to Celebrated!

Amy writes:
“I’m thrilled to be able to help bring stories like these to kids who so need to find characters with whom they can identify.”


Day3_Tango_Tulip Lavender_Censored2Celebrated_YouTube

Three is a powerful number in this book due to baby penguin, Tango, born to Roy and Silo, a family of male penguins, at Central Park in New York City.  According to the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF), in 2014 it was also third on the list for attempting bans in communities across the USA. And it is my pleasure to celebrate And Tango Makes Three on Day 3 of our #aBookaDay preparations for the Celebration Tour in June.

I have to admit that I was surprised when I realized the extent that Tango had been censored, not just in its early years, but even through 2014. The reasons given for challenging it are listed as follows: “Anti-family, homosexuality, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, unsuited for age group….and promotes the homosexual agenda.” For these reasons, “Tango ranked as ALA’s most frequently challenged book for a record four years in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2010.” Check out this timeline from the American Library Association for a visual history of banned books in the US.

As I mentioned, my family and I read this book without realizing thow much it has been banned over the past 9 years. Given that my daughter, Tulip, was born in 2008, and that she has a mother with a Master’s Degree in Sexuality Studies, it is not surprising that she didn’t find this book to be controversial or unusual. We both loved it, and had a great chat about it here.


While Tango engaged both my 6 year old and 16 month old, it also had the added benefit of finally helping us name our very large penguin – a much beloved and bemusing gift from Grandpa. (Our family penguin is now, yes, “Tango Lavender.”)

Tango also allowed us to further explore how families can grow and thrive when they have a safe environment where their strengths, innovations, and connections are recognized, and, yes, celebrated.

My Favorite Quote
Out came their very own baby! She had fuzzy white feathers and a funny black beak. Now, Roy and Silo were fathers. “We’ll call her Tango,” Mr. Gramzay decided, “because it takes two to make a Tango.” 


Many people have read this book on video. Here Tango is engagingly read by staff at Seattle’s Sanislo Elementary School during Banned Book Week: 

Here’s a fun, more adult video clip with staff and visitors to the Central Park Zoo about how Roy and Silo became a committed couple, and had baby Tango.

Finally, I appreciate the sentiment shared on this version of the video
“Everyone should have the right to see themselves & their families in the books they read.”


How Do You Celebrate Diversity?

  • Do you have a favorite book that celebrates diversity?
  • Have you read the And Tango Makes Three?
  • Why do you think it’s been challenged so often?

Share in the comments how this, or another book, has changed – or even saved – a life. I will be highlighting your celebratory quotes about books I feature in my a-book-a-day blog.

Click to find out how you can support the Celebration Tour.

Thank you for your generosity!

In celebration~
Melita

PS: Click here to gift this book, or another book, to a library along the Celebration Tour!

Tulip Lavender on Libraries

Support Libraries & Librarians by Supporting our Celebration Tour!

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Alaina Szlachta_difference quote_censored2celebrated_May15

Talking Diversity with Alaina Szlachta

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Check out this video with Sexuality Educator & Researcher: Alaina Szlachta, MEd, PhD.C
Alaina Szlachta You Tube Image 05.12.15 #Censored2Celebrated

Watch right here.

Sign up for future After Party chats & other Exclusive Opportunities here.

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Celebration Tour of Books

Announcement: Celebration Tour 2015

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I have been planting lots of seeds over the past four years. It’s been quite a journey growing this personal and professional garden. These days, it is amazing to me how all those chilly winter months and April showers have made their impact, and my life has burst into bloom like a flower in May. Even more amazing to me is that the blooms are popping up from Austin to Montreal.

Blooming with Celebration 
Today, I am thrilled to announce that my family and I will embark on a Celebration Tour for two months this summer. Specifically, my family and I will seek out – and share – great books Celebrating Diverse Sexuality & Gender (DSG). We are big fans of our local libraries, and are excited to visit with librarians in public libraries in the US and in eastern Canada. Our goal is to gift a book celebrating themes of DSG to each library we visit.

Laverne Cox on "I Am Jazz"Here you can see my 6 year old daughter reading one of her favorite books: I Am Jazz. This book celebrates the life of an American trans teen, Jazz Jennings. Jazz is the founder of her own mermaid tail company Purple Rainbow Tails.  Her mermaid tail company raises money for the Transkids Purple Rainbow Foundation – of which she is an honorary co-founder. In addition to I Am Jazzthere are an increasing number of books being published by and for youth about DSG.

Growing Our Summer Garden

In June, I am excited to embark on the Celebration Tour to talk with librarians about DSG literature and the conversations they are having with their communities. In July,  I am excited for the opportunity to delve into the history and variety of children’s and YA literature celebrating DSG during an interview with Dr. Sally Ember on her globally-accessible webcast Changes. In August, we will make the journey back to Austin – with a different route and more visits to libraries. We will be sharing pictures and adventures along the way on social media and some special extras for the #Censored2Celebrated email list. Would you like us to take a photo just for you along the way?

Why seek out librarians?
Quite simply, librarians are some of the most interesting people to talk with not only about books and research, but also about their communities. Indeed, during a recent Censored2Celebrated interview with author and sexuality educator, Cory Silverberg, I spoke with Cory about his parents who are a librarian and a sex therapist. In response to my own surprise that I had zeroed in on his librarian parent, Cory noted how interesting librarians are.


Cory & Melita talking about librarians – all cued up right here.

Ever since my chat with Cory, I’ve been thinking a lot about librarians. Two of my mentors from middle school were librarians, and I still treasure a kid’s book by Alice Walker that they gifted to me at graduation. When I lived in San Francisco as a young adult, I did some work with the San Francisco Public Library, and remembered how much I enjoy librarians.

Now I have children of my own. We love going to our public libraries in Austin. We love talking with librarians. They know so much about books and their communities. My inquiring mind wants to know what communities in the US and Canada are talking and reading about diverse sexuality and gender. It’s clearly time to talk with some librarians in as many communities as possible. Lucky for me, my family is up for the adventure!

We would like to gift a book to every library we visit on our trip from Austin to Montreal, and back again. Can you help us celebrate DSG by spreading more seeds to bloom at libraries in the US and Canada this summer?

Visiting Lbraries from Austin to Montreal and Back

Click here to see some of the states & provinces we’ll be visiting!


How can I help support #Censored2Celebrated with this Celebration Tour?

Thank you for asking! There are a few ways you can help support us to celebrate diverse sexuality & gender on our Celebration Tour.

  1. I have a great book celebrating DSG to add to your Censored2Celebrated Wish List!
    Great! Contact Melita here.
  2. Will you purchase a book (or more!) before June 30, 2015 to donate to a public library?
    Here’s our Censored2Celebrated Wish List.
    (Books are automatically sent to Melita in Texas, and will be donated to a public library in the US or Canada.)
  3. Are you an author of a book celebrating DSG? Would you like to donate a signed copy of your book(s) to donate to a public library?
    Great, we’d love to support & celebrate your work! 
    Contact Melita here.
  4. Can you help us spread the word?
    Please click here to share about our Celebration Tour.
  5. Celebration Tour needs supporters and funding.  We are in the start-up phase, and gratefully accept monetary donations to support our celebration of diverse sexuality and gender. ($3, $7 or $19 can buy a great book or a meal to keep us fueled on the Celebration Tour.)

Celebration Tour Support Levels

  • DSG  (count the letters)    $3.00 USD
  • LGBTQIA  (count the letters)    $7.00 USD
  • Number of…Countries worldwide with legalized same-sex marriage    $19.00 USD
  • Number of…US states with marriage equality  – JUST UPDATED!   $50.00 USD
  • Number of Driving miles from…Burlington, VT to Montreal, QC    $94.00 USD
  • Number of Driving miles from…Vass, NC to Philadelphia, PA    $464.00 USD
  • Number of Driving miles from…Austin, TX to Boston, MA    $1,965.00 USD

PayPal - The safer, easier way to pay online!

 

How can we celebrate you?

  • We would like to give you a shout out online about your support when you donate funds and/or book(s).
  • We would like to acknowledge your generosity with a dedication bookplate in the front of each donated book. Check out our Book Wish List Celebrating Diverse Sexuality & Gender here. All books will be read, celebrated & gifted to a library!

Communication is sexy!
Please connect with Melita by email or on Facebook with your preferred way for us to celebrate you.

We’re always open to your questions, comments, and celebrations for us, too!

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Find out more about Censored2Celebrated here.

Celebrating DSG

Celebrating the diversity of sexuality & gender, one (webcasted) conversation at a time.

#Censored2Celebrated offers a monthly webcast expanding the global celebration of sexuality & gender diversity, one conversation at a time. 

Webcasted interviews feature a wide range of guests who celebrate the diversity of sexuality and gender, both professionally and personally. Melita and her guest(s) have a “come as you are” conversation once a month online for 30 minutes – join us!

The webcast is FREE to all in order to expand the conversation using the accessible, global medium of Google Hangouts on Air (live webcast) and YouTube (replays).

Video clip about DSG with Josh McAdams:

On the #Censored2Celebrated webcast we discuss topics such as:

  • The LGBTQ+ Alphabet Soup of Sexuality Orientation & Gender Identity, including newer terms like #DSG (Diverse Sexuality & Gender)
  • Aha moments that our guest(s) experience in their professional work (for example: at DSG conferences, in research, in volunteer work) as well as in their personal life
  • How to find inspiration to move from from censorship to celebration around Diverse Sexuality & Gender

If you want to learn about how you can experience more celebration – and less censorship – in your professional and personal life, join us as we explore the alphabet soup of sexuality and gender.

We look forward to expanding the conversation with you!

In celebration~

Melita Noël Cantú, MA (Sexuality Studies, SFSU)
Host, From Censored to Celebrated


P.S. If you’d like to be on the EMAIL NOTIFICATION LIST to get notified about future #Censored2Celebrated shows and when video replays and show notes are posted.

CLICK HERE: Join the *Free* Email List for Exclusive Opportunities

You may also ping us on Google+, Facebook or Twitter with a request to be added to the G+ #Censored2Celebrated Circle for upcoming notifications.


Thanks to Javier López Cantú for the use of his digital photograph in #Censored2Celebrated images.

Photograph Title: Stand By Your Dan (2007)
More info, images & video at: www.JLCart.com

All rights reserved by the  Javier López Cantú Artworkstudio.

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